God
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God

All creationists believe in some sort of deity. Although many evolutionists are athiests, there are some that still believe in a higher power. This portion of the Creation vs. Evolution page deals with who God is and how evolutionists reconcile God with science. For the sake of convenience, I refer to God with male pronouns, although many religious people believe that God is neither male nor female.

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Religion's Answer:

God is the Creator of all things, the only qualified Judge of people. People communicate with God through prayers and believe He is responsible for miracles and blessings. God represents all that is good in the world. Christians believe that God had a Son, Jesus Christ, and that believing in Christ will earn one eternal salvation. They believe in a Trinity: God, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Jews believe in only one God, called Adonai. Judaism is the oldest known monotheistic religion. Muslims, also, believe in only one God, called Allah.
To please God, people perform good deeds. Good people are rewarded after death while bad people are punished, although views on heaven and hell differ between religious streams. Jews and Christians believe that eventually, the Messiah (Christ, for Christians) will come to earth and usher in an age of peace and tranquility for believers.

Science and God:

Many evolutionists are athiests, which means they believe there is no God. Still more are agnostics, which mean they feel they can neither prove nor disprove God's existance. Many more are 'culturally religious,' participating in holidays and rituals without believing in a deity. And others reconcile God with science in a myriad of beliefs.
Theistic Evolution, the official position of the Roman Catholic Church, says that God creates through evolution. It accepts much of modern science, but invokes God for some things outside the realm of science, such as the creation of the human soul. Materialistic Evolutionists believe that God created evolution as a process for creation.